Diploma of Media & Communication

The Diploma of Media and Communication offers a range of study paths across communications and journalism subjects.

Key Information

Duration

12 months

Intake Dates

February, June, October

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Campus Location

Melbourne

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Fees

Domestic International

Fees

A$31,100

CRICOS 077121K

Course overview

Express yourself with communication skills

The Diploma of Media and Communication offers a range of choices in communications and journalism subjects. Areas of study include broadcast media, journalism, screen and sound studies, strategic communication, writing and further studies across a range of humanities disciplines.

Start to learn the processes and skills required for interviewing while being introduced to strategic communication and the mediums of screen and sound. You'll study subjects and skills that are relevant to all areas of specialisation offered at La Trobe University.

Diploma of Media and Communications students now receive full credit of 8 subjects (120 points) into 2nd year of the Bachelor of Arts (any major). Satisfactory completion of any Year 12 English and Mathematical Methods or Specialist Mathematics is a prerequisite for this Diploma.

Degree pathway

  • Bachelor of Arts (Digital Media Major)
  • Bachelor of Arts (Any Major)*
  • Bachelor of Media and Communication (all majors except Sports Media)

   ○   Majors:

  • Creative and Professional Writing
  • Journalism
  • Marketing
  • Media Industries

   ○   Minors :

  • Creative and Professional Writing
  • Journalism
  • Digital Marketing Communication
  • Media Industries
  • Sports Media

* Students can take 2 majors. Digital Media must be one of the majors. Additionally, students may need to forfeit credit depending on second major.

Course structure

What you’ll be studying*

Throughout your Diploma of Media and Communication, you’ll study eight core units before graduation.

This subject will introduce you to the practice of writing in order of importance (inverted pyramid style) for various media platforms and audiences. You will learn to write short form news articles for print (newspapers and online news sites) and radio. Students will examine the fundamental skills of news-writing and information gathering for the media, including press releases, daily news stories and feature articles. The process of identifying and writing stories within these formats will be discussed and analysed. The key learning outcomes of news judgement, distilling information, writing concisely, and writing material in order of what is most important are transferable across a range of vocations. You do not have aspire to be a news journalist to use the skills you will learn in this subject.

Class requirements

Timetabled hours per week (4 hours) 48 hours in total

  • One 2-hour lecture per week
  • One 2-hour tutorial per week

 

Assessments

Assessment Type  When Weighting Learning Outcome Assessed
Assessment Task 1: Diagnostic writing assessment (500-word equivalent) Week 4 20% 1,2 
Assessment Task 2: Writing folio activity (2000-word equivalent  Throughout Trimester 20% 1-5 
Assessment Task 3: Quizzes (1250-word equivalent) Throughout Trimester 40% 1,2 

As workplaces become more interactive and interconnected, interviewing skills are becoming more important across a range of vocations. In this subject, students study the processes and skills required for interviewing, focusing on key case studies in literature, print journalism, cinema, and broadcasting and online. A key component of the subject will be interviews undertaken by students in all or some of the key interview formats, including live discussion, email, pre-recorded audio, and written profile pieces. Students undertaking this subject will gain a broader appreciation of the art of inquiry and personal interaction and develop greater confidence in everything from one-on-one communications to public speaking to critical analysis. Students will also gain a clear understanding of the use of quotation technique including quote punctuation, in written work and develop an appreciation of key editing issues, both practical and ethical.

Class requirements

Timetabled hours per week (4 hours) – 48 hours in total

  • One 2-hour lecture per week
  • One 2-hour tutorial per week

 

Assessments

Assessment Type When  Weighting
In class exercises portfolio Multiple dates x 8 in class exercises 20%
One essay (1000 words) Week 7 10%
A researched interview and written profile with a 500-word self-reflection report (2000 words equivalent)  Week 12  50% 

This subject takes an interdisciplinary approach to the adaptation of stories between the literary arts, theatre, cinema and virtual media. How do stories change when they move from stage to screen, from book page to web page, from live performance to YouTube? Is the book always better than the film? How do stories move us? Students will analyse ways in which storytellers use existing stories: to challenge, re-brand, or re-examine texts from a different point of view. The subject will evaluate the dynamic and contested relationships between the source text and its adaptations. Students will have practical opportunities to create their own adaptations and discover new ways of thinking about and creating stories across different media.

Class requirements

Timetabled hours per week (4 hours) – 48 

  • One 2-hour lecture per week 
  • One 2-hour tutorial per week

 

Assessments

Assessment Type When Weighting 
Assessment 1: Folio Weeks 2 to 10 35%
Assessment 2: Essay  TBC 35%
Assessment 3: Creative Project Week 12  30% 

The Emerging Journalist introduces students to the shifting roles and responsibilities of journalists and journalism within liberal democratic societies. At the successful completion of The Emerging Journalist, you will appreciate the contemporary media landscape and the role of journalists and media organisations in relation to social, economic, political, and cultural power structures. Topics and issues covered include: the changing nature of audiences and the new ways that journalists are engaging and interacting with audiences; the journalistic applications of social media; best practices in reporting and writing; and the impacts of cultural and technological impacts on journalism as both a profession and as a practice.

Class requirements

Timetabled hours per week (4 hours) – 48 hours in total

  • One 2-hour lecture per week 
  • One 2-hour tutorial per week

 

Assessments

Assessment Type When Weighting
Individual Test X 5  Throughout Trimester 25% (5 x 5%) 
Assessment Task 1: Two 700-word news exercises Week 8 & 12  35%
Assessment Task 2: Feature article and pitch TBC 40%  

Learning to write well brings benefits within and beyond university. This interdisciplinary unit offers you the opportunity to strengthen your professional, creative and academic writing skills. We develop a conceptual framework for analysing the writing of others and editing your own work effectively, as well as improving your skills in the generation of ideas, elements of style and identification with the audience. These areas of writing will be explored through modules with theoretical and practical components: -- Academic writing, including essay writing, essay structure, avoiding plagiarism, editing, and proofreading. -- Non-fiction writing across a number of genres, particularly writing for popular media, reviews of the arts and writing for the web. -- Creative writing, which can include fiction, poetry, and scriptwriting. 

Class requirements

Timetabled hours per week (4 hours) – 48 hours in total

  • One 2-hour lecture per week 
  • One 2-hour tutorial per week

 

Assessments

Assessment Type When Weighting
One creative reflection (1000 words) This task includes an online workshop component worth 5% (in tutorials during Week 4). Week 4 25%
Assignment 2: A critical analysis of some of your earlier writing using one element of the ‘toolbox’ (1000 words, 20%) This task includes an online workshop worth 5% (in tutorials during Week 8). Week 8 25%
Assignment 3: A writing folio based on ten of your weekly writing exercises (2000 words)  Week 12  50% 

Marketing: Stand and Deliver is an introductory subject to marketing principles and practice as applied to mainly fast-moving consumer goods. A key focus of this subject will be development of communication and presentation skills that are integral to the marketing profession and success in business. Through the integration of these skills within the subject, you will develop transferable skills that will used throughout your business career to engage with a range of stakeholders. Topics will cover the marketing concept, the marketing environment, buying behaviour in consumer and organisational markets, customer segmentation, targeting and positioning, developing the marketing mix, and the implementation and control of marketing programs. This subject provides a sound foundation for future marketing subjects, advanced skill-development, and your career.

Class requirements

Timetabled hours per week (4 hours) – 48 hours in total

  • One 2-hour lecture per week 
  • One 2-hour tutorial per week

 

Assessments

Assessment Type When  Weighting
Individual Test X 10 Weeks 1-5, 7-8 & 10-12 20% (10 x 2%)
Individual Assignment – Written Report & Video presentation Week 7 40%
Group Assignment - Written Report & Video presentation Weeks: 11/12 Report 10%
Presentation 10%  

In this introductory subject, students will learn some basic television and news-gathering techniques and create their own news program. Students will learn a lot in a short time about working in a studio, as a member of a team while applying what is learned in journalism to activities and assessments in this class.

Although the culmination of this subject is the successful screening of a television news bulletin, almost all of the technique’s students will learn are transferable to other areas of the media. Making Media will give students the opportunity to acquire foundation skills in video and sound editing, as well as writing and scripting a television news bulletin.

Class requirements

Timetabled hours per week (4 hours) – 48 hours in total

  • One 2-hour lecture per week 
  • One 2-hour tutorial per week

 

Assessments

Assessment Type  When Weighting
Assessment One Short Essay  Week 4 30%
Assessment Two News Production  Week 12 40%
Assessment Three Reflection Week 12 30%

Thinking and reasoning are essential components of human life. But much of our thinking and reasoning is biased, distorted, and uninformed. This subject trains you to reason well, to think clearly and independently, and also to engage fairly with others in discussions and debates. You will develop useful skills in presenting, analysing, and evaluating different types of arguments. You will learn to apply these skills to real cases from popular culture, current affairs, and philosophy. You will also learn to use diagrams and symbols to assist higher and more abstract levels of logical reasoning and systematic thinking. Because the ability to think and to argue clearly and fairly is central not just to philosophy but to university studies in general, many students find the experience gained in this subject immensely valuable, both within the university and later in employment whatever their subsequent areas of specialization.

Class requirements

Timetabled hours per week (4 hours) – 48 

  • One 2-hour lecture per week 
  • One 2-hour tutorial per week

 

Assessments

Assessment Type When Weighting
Quiz Weeks 2 to 11 30%
Short Assignment 1 (500 words) Week 5 15%
Short Assignment 2 (500 words)  Week 9 15%
Essay (1000-1500 words) Week 12 40%

Popular career paths

Employment and career options after completing your Bachelor’s degree:

  • Advertising and Sales promotion
  • Government policy research
  • Journalism
  • Marketing
  • Broadcast and online content production
  • Media production
  • Public relations
  • Publishing and editing
  • Television and radio production

Learn more about this Diploma

Find out more about what you can expect from the Diploma of Media and Communication directly from the course co-ordinator.

More information

Entry requirements

View entry requirements for domestic and international students.

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How to apply

Ready to apply for this Diploma? Follow the application process for La Trobe College Australia.